Jet Advisors Blog

Fractional Programs: Do You Really Own a Piece of the Aircraft?

Posted on Wed, Aug 20,2014

describe the imageWhen the fractional ownership of aircraft concept was introduced over 30 years ago no one knew what it was or how it worked. I think the hardest concept of fractional aircraft ownership to grasp was the outright ownership or leasehold of a portion of a very expensive piece of equipment (whole values range from $5 Million for a used small cabin aircraft to $60 Million plus for a large cabin new aircraft). I know when I was new in the fractional aircraft business coming from an original equipment manufacturer it was a concept that took me awhile to master and then explain to prospects. Some describe fractional aircraft ownership as be similar to vacation timeshares and while there are similarities the two concepts/businesses are worlds apart.

Vacation timeshares do provide you with ownership of a tangible asset and most give you title to a specific unit that is recorded in a local government office (such as the County Recorder or Assessor) along with an agreement to share the cost of maintenance and upkeep of the property. The asset is divided normally by a unit of time such as a week so you have rights to the (your) property once a year for that specific week. Also your period of ownership of the property is determined by you and you can dispose of it to anyone you desire and some timeshare operators/managers provide the option to sell your property back to them.

However, with fractional aircraft ownership or leasehold you acquire an undivided percentage interest in a specific aircraft (not a wing or an engine) and the size of the interest determines how much use of the aircraft (flight hours) you have during a 12 month period. If you purchase an interest this is documented by a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) bill of sale and a FAA application for registration, both of which are filed with the FAA in Oklahoma City and specify that you own an undivided interest in a specific whole aircraft. If you have a leasehold interest in an aircraft, this is evidenced by the filing of the lease with the local FAA Flight Standards District Office (FSDO) and is supposed to be carried on the aircraft that it is associated with during all flights. Unlike vacation timeshares, your term of ownership of the interest in the aircraft or your leasehold of an aircraft is for a preset period of time, normally five (5) years, and you are limited to who you can sell your aircraft share to and limited to who you can assign your leasehold to by the fractional aircraft program providers terms and conditions. Even though you own your undivided interest in the aircraft, if you sell it to a third party or sell it back to the fractional aircraft program manager there are fees and potential penalties.

So, yes you do own a piece of an aircraft (not just a wing or an engine) but you are limited to what you can do with your share when it comes time to dispose of it.

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Topics: fractional, fractional ownership, private jet, fractional share, private jets, fractional program, fractional jet program, fractional co-owner, fractional light jets, fractional consulting, fractional travel

Recognizing when a Deal is Too Good to be True

Posted on Fri, Apr 11,2014

Aircraft Discussion The old saying 'if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is' holds true in most instances. It can be especially costly to you in the field of aviation if you fly charter, use a fractional service or have a whole aircraft or share a whole aircraft.

Aircraft are rather unique vehicles for travel in that most others wear out and get retired, but with an aircraft, as long as they are inspected and maintained to their manufacturer’s and the governmental agency that oversees them requirements they don’t wear out, to a point. This is one area to be concerned with if you are looking to buy a whole aircraft or share a whole aircraft with partners. Older aircraft have lower acquisition costs as compared to newer like aircraft but as aircraft age the maintenance and inspections become progressively more intensive. So you pay less upfront but the costs to keep the aircraft airworthy are higher, much higher than a newer aircraft. Also with whole aircraft ownership your travel patterns can cost you more. If you fly somewhere and stay, do you ferry the aircraft back empty to its base or do you keep it with you. If you keep it with you what do you do with your crew? Do you pay for them to fly home or do you pay their hotel, meal and rental car costs while they stay. Keeping the aircraft with you may not be an option if you share the ownership with others.

If you share the aircraft with others, who gets first priority for its use? If you are second inline do you not travel or do you have to find alternative means at your expense? Keeping in mind even when you are not using your aircraft you still incur expenses for its upkeep, hangar, crew, insurance, etc. If you have lease financed the aircraft you own or share, what are the aircraft condition requirements (cosmetically and mechanically) at end of the lease term? These can be substantial.

With fractional programs and charter operators what is your real cost? Like todays pricing for airline travel there can be many “hidden” costs. When a fractional company provides a proposal to enter their program do they include the depreciation on your aircraft asset (50% or more over a five year term), fuel adjustment (usually over a thousand dollars per hour) to your advertised hourly rate, flight time minimums, or taxes in the proposal? With charter companies you can ask the same questions, is the quote all inclusive or are there hidden charges like crew overnight fees, hangar fees if the weather is bad at your destination and catering charges. With charter or fractional programs, what if you make last minute changes to your itinerary or cancel the flight? What if the air transportation provider is late or doesn’t show up at all, what is your recourse?

As stated above, if the deal being offered appears to be great (too good to be true) compared to your other options, you need to find out why.

Topics: jet card, charter, fractional, fractional ownership, charter flights, fractional share, private jets, jet lease, fractional program, fractional jet program, fractional co-owner, jet co-owner, private jet co-owner, fractional light jets, fractional consulting

Quelling Nervous Flying

Posted on Thu, Mar 27,2014

Safe LandingIt matters if you fly commercially, or privately, if you are a nervous, or fearful flyer, to some extent. Most flyers (if you are not a pilot or the pilot for the flight) have some misgivings each time they fly, but some of us just resign ourslves to the fact that you need to fly and have little control over the many factors that could impact the flight.

Some factors that cause concern regardless of flying commercially, or privately, are obvious like the weather, over water flights, mountainous terrain, airports in the mountains and small airports (usually short narrow landing strips). Some are not so obvious but due to past accidents and the subsequent news reports still cause some concern. Some not so obvious concerns include security, aircraft maintenance condition, pilot complacency (dependence on automation versus pilot skills), pilot training and experience and pilot fatigue.

Outside influences such as hijacking, terrorist activities and the growing incidents of lasers pointed at cockpits are also thought about prior to flight by some. In private aviation hijacking and terrorist activities are unlikely but the threat from laser light (accidental or on purpose) is growing in the US and in Europe. After 9/11 and other previous horrible events (Lockerbie Scotland) commercial travelers were on edge and the recent “disappearance” of the Malaysian airliner has done little to quell those fears.

So how do you overcome your fears and what can you do? If you fly commercially there is little you can do to change a flight plan, the point of origin of the flight and the destination, checking the experience and training of the crews or the quality of the aircraft maintenance. These are all controlled by the airline. US airlines have a very enviable safety history; however you are still at their mercy when it comes to security check in, crowded aircraft and the unavoidable delays and cancellations. If you fly privately, either on your own aircraft, through a fractional program or by charter, it is a different story.

If you own or co-own the aircraft then you have firsthand knowledge of the crews experience and training and the maintenance status of the aircraft.  In addition, you pick departure and arrival location, times for the flight, who you fly with and most importantly you have the ability to terminate or not start a flight if there are any factors that bother you. If you participate in a fractional program you have the comfort factor (if your provider is one of the larger ones) that pilots are highly skilled and routinely trained, the aircraft is maintained as it should be (with a large staff overseeing such maintenance) and you have the ability to cancel or terminate the flight if you have a weather or other concern, however, you might get charged for the cancelled flight. With most charter operators they can provide you with their past histories and audit reports from independent aviation professionals and, as with fractional programs, you have the ability to cancel or delay flights for any reason but once again you may be charged for any itinerary changes or cancelations.

So what should you do? Do your homework on the method of air transportation you use and if using commercial stay vigilant. If you have your own aircraft make sure your crew knows your preferences and if you fly fractional or charter these companies usually build a profile on your likes and dislikes, make sure the profile is accurate.

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Topics: jet card, charter, fractional, fractional ownership, private jets, jet lease, fractional program, fractional jet program, fractional co-owner, jet co-owner, private jet co-owner, fractional light jets, fractional consulting, airports, Nervous Flying, Malaysia

Danger in the Skies, Laser Pointers

Posted on Tue, Mar 11,2014

Plane at SunsetLaser pointers have been commercially available since the 1980s and are seen everywhere from boardrooms, classrooms, in tools, cat and dog toys and even in gas stations as novelties. So why would the FBI offer a $10,000 reward to anyone that helps them to apprehend and convict someone pointing one of these seemingly harmless devices at an aircraft?

Most laser pointers available to the public are pretty harmless if used as they are intended to be and care is made not to shine them in someone’s eyes from close up. However, the danger to aircraft operations comes from the strong concentrated light they emit, the spread of this light at distances and the potential to distract, startle, cause flash blindness and the concern of injury (but at distances the risk of injury is low, at least from the laser beam). Currently there are no commercially available lasers that can physically damage an aircraft and it is unknown and doubtful that there are military lasers that could.

When using a laser outside at night it appears the beam ends at a relatively short distance from the user but that is incorrect and the beam spreads at longer distance like an ordinary flash light. At one half of a mile the beam from a handheld laser spreads to approximately the size of a doorway. When the beam spreads it has the potential to reflect from aircraft windscreens similar to when you are driving at night and an oncoming car does not dim their lights. Aircraft cockpits are kept in low light and the brightness of a laser beam can temporarily blind the crew, not a good thing when flying straight and level but extremely dangerous during the takeoff or landing phase of flight.

Lasers used in laser shows are 6 watts and green in color (green is the preferred color since that color can be seen more easily by the human eye than other colors and are less expensive to manufacture). Even though the light spreads at distances a laser show style laser can reach over 368,000 feet (70 miles) and at that distance the main danger is distraction. At lesser distances the dangers increase, eye hazard at 1,700 feet, flash blindness at 8,700 feet (1.5 miles) and glare at 36,800 feet (7 miles).

Commercial hand held lasers are usually about 5 mW and green in color but even at this lower wattage eye hazard could occur at 52 feet, flash blindness up to 262 feet, glare up to 1,171 feet and distraction up to 11,712 feet.

As mentioned above, this issue is being taken seriously as incidents continue to increase. In 2013 there were 3,960 (average 11 per day) reported instances in the US (up from 1,416 in 2009) and over 4,266 (average 12 per day) in Europe. If you are caught and convicted you could face fines and possibly jail time. A man in California was sentenced to 30 months in jail for pointing a laser at an aircraft and just last week another California man was sentenced to 14 years in prison for pointing a laser at a police helicopter. The second man’s girlfriend was also involved in the incident and is facing a $250,000 fine and 5 years in prision.


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Topics: jet card, charter, fractional, private jet, private jets, jet lease, airports, laser pointers

Understanding the Health of Your Fractional Program

Posted on Fri, Nov 01,2013

describe the image Participation in a fractional aircraft program is a good way to fly privately without buying a whole aircraft and covering the costs of such ownership if you do not fly more than 200/250 flight hours a year. Fractional ownership is not inexpensive but compared to the cost of owning and operating a whole aircraft for just 50/100 flight hours per year makes fractional programs somewhat of a bargain.

In the past almost all fractional programs were wholly owned subsidiaries of the manufacturer of the aircraft provided by the specific fractional provider. That has changed, today only one fractional provider is still owned by the aircraft manufacturer of the aircraft they use and this company is being sold to another fractional program not supported or owned by an aircraft manufacturer.

Does it matter if the fractional program is or is not owned by the aircraft manufacturer or other substantial corporation? Even if it is owned by the aircraft manufacturer or other corporate entity is that any guarantee of economic stability? Remember Lehman Brothers, who would have foresaw their demise? However, if it is a well-run and profitable fractional program I would say having a substantial parent is not necessary to insure stability. How can you tell if the fractional program is well run and profitable? On the financial side if it is a public company that reports its own financial condition then it is simple, but what if its results are combined with the parents reports? There are several signs that would provide indications that all may not be well at your fractional provider.

Some of the signs are appearance of the aircraft supplied (are they clean, in good repair with cabin convenience items functioning properly), is the aircraft supplied when and where requested, have flights been delayed or canceled without the offer of a backup aircraft, and are crews supplied professional and appear satisfied with their employment (pilots are usually pretty candid about their employer and how things are going with their company). Another sign that could indicate potential problems are the level of the fees charged for your participation in the fractional program and for flights taken. This will take a little homework but all fractional programs have web sites that usually contain their product pricing and there are other aviation related sites that provide costs of operation for specific aircraft types. Are your fees higher, about the same or lower as compared to other programs or as compared to published operational costs? It is OK to have lower costs and fees but are they so low that your fractional program is unsustainable. If your program is unsustainable at the costs and fees charged you should have concerns on safety of the aircraft and its operation and the return on your investment.

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Topics: fractional, fractional ownership, fractional share, private jets, fractional program, fractional jet program, fractional co-owner, fractional light jets

Who Else Owns My Fractional Jet?

Posted on Wed, Aug 14,2013

Private Jet, Gulfstream 450You own a fractional share in a specific aircraft through one of the several fractional aircraft programs, and you want (or need) to know who the other owners are. What can you do? Some programs have an ownership agreement that is supposed to be signed by all of the owners of a specific aircraft; if that is the case with your program, you could ask the program provider for a copy of the agreement signed by all owners. Even if your program provider does not require a separate agreement amongst the owners of a specific aircraft, you could request that information from them anyway.

If the program provider will not or cannot supply you with a list of the other owners, what are other options to obtain this information? If your fractional program is based in the United States, then your aircraft is required to be registered with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Most of the information filed with the FAA pertaining to aircraft ownership and registration is public information and easily accessed, if you know where to look. To gain co-ownership information, you will need to know your aircraft’s FAA registration number (also referred to as the tail number or N-Number - this information should be stated in your program provider agreements). Then you can simply go to the FAA web site ( and then to the N-Number Inquiry page. Type in your registration number and you will get a list of the other co-owners.

Private Jet Gulfstream 350The problem with getting a list of the other co-owners from the fractional provider, or from the FAA website, is the lack of contact information. It is doubtful the fractional provider would give you anything but the name the share is owned under, and that is all the FAA provides via their website. To add to this lack of information, most fractional providers use their address, not the co-owner's address, on the registration document and bill of sale to provide an additional level of anonymity for the aircraft co-owners.

You do have other options, such as the subscription service JETNET Online ( With access to JetNet, you can search for the other co-owners and drill down for contact information such as an address, a phone number, or an email address. All you need to know to conduct the search is the name of another co-owner (if you happen to already know of one), the FAA registration number, or your specific aircraft manufacturer’s serial number. (Like the registration number, the serial number should also be stated in the program provider agreements.) 

Even with the ability to search FAA records and the availability of online services to mine additional information, you can still run into problems determining the real end owner. If the ownership is held in the name of a trust (and many are) or the aircraft share was financed by a financial institution and leased back to the owner, then the true owner or responsible party is masked.

Topics: fractional, fractional ownership, private jet, fractional share, private jets, fractional program, fractional jet program, fractional co-owner, jet co-owner, private jet co-owner

Fractional Jet Programs: Trouble in Paradise

Posted on Thu, Aug 01,2013

Private Jet Learjet 45XRYou reviewed the various fractional programs and selected the one that was the best for your travel needs. For years you enjoyed the flight services provided and everything was working as advertised and as you expected – then the service became erratic and a little later nonexistent.  What do you do?  More importantly, what can you do?

If you leased the fractional aircraft share and have consistently flown your allotted hours, you may be in good shape. If your lease was direct with the provider and not with a third party financial institution, your biggest problem might be simply finding another provider for your air transportation needs. However, if you purchased the fractional share, you’re in a completely different position.  Not only will you need to find alternative travel arrangements, but what do you do about your owned interest in the aircraft, your asset?

Most (but not all) fractional programs have a guaranteed buy-back provision in the event of default by the provider. Even if your fractional program agreements have the guaranteed buy-back provision and the service is discontinued, the cause is mostly likely due to the financial condition of the provider.

If your fractionally owned aircraft is fully sold into the fractional share program (i.e. wholly owned by you and other participants in the program and no fractional share is held by the provider), you can try to contact the other owners of the aircraft (FAA records are public information) and reach an agreement amongst yourselves on what to do with the aircraft. Options may include finding a third party manager for the aircraft with the owners sharing the costs of operation and use of the aircraft based on how much they own – I do not think this is feasible unless the aircraft is the rare fractional program aircraft with just a few owners – or selling it on the open market. However, any of the options may be difficult to pursue due to the structure of the program agreement you signed and the legal requirements if the provider has declared bankruptcy.

Selling the aircraft on the open market is probably the best option, but it will have its own set of issues to overcome. Is the aircraft airworthy? The fractional provider is required to keep the aircraft airworthy, but if the provider is in a financial bind, has airworthiness actually been maintained?  What about the engines that go with your specific aircraft? Some providers state in the program agreements that the aircraft will have a specific type of engine installed while others specify the exact serial number of the engines. If serial numbers are specified, where are the engines and how do you get them reinstalled on your aircraft?  Is your aircraft lien free? And - probably the most important item - where are the aircraft log books and are they complete and up-to-date? 

Even if your aircraft is airworthy, the appropriate engines are installed, there are no liens, and the log books are complete, what about its fair market value?  Even a small fractional provider going under can have a huge impact on aircraft values when that provider’s fleet is placed on the market. For instance, if 25 used aircraft of a specific type are currently for sale, with only 3 sales in the last 6 months, an insolvent provider with a fleet of 50 aircraft of that type would flood the market. The addition of 50 extra aircraft on the used market would add approximately 8 years of available used inventory, swiftly crushing that aircraft type’s market value.

If you find yourself in a situation where your fractional provider fails to deliver the service you signed on for and want help with the fallout, please feel free to call us at 617.600.6868 and we'll help you navigate your options and find a solution to your private jet needs.

Topics: fractional, fractional ownership, private jet, fractional share, private jets, jet lease, fractional program, fractional jet program

Fractional Jet Ancillary Agreements

Posted on Fri, Jun 21,2013

In previous blogs, I discussed getting into and out of fractional ownership programs and how those programs work. This is the final installment in the fractional program blog series, and now I’ll cover the ancillary agreements that make up most fractional programs’ document package.

The main agreements are the fractional aircraft purchase agreement (or lease, if you choose that option) and the fractional aircraft management services agreement – these two agreements form the core of the document package. Not all fractional providers have the same agreement structure but have combined the necessary terms and conditions into other agreements to make the program work. Other agreements include:

  • Fractional Share Gulfstream G200 Jetthe fractional aircraft owners agreement,

  • fractional aircraft dry-lease and exchange agreement,

  • aircraft acceptance form,

  • limited power of attorney,

  • corporate resolution,

  • warranty bill of sale and assignment, and

  • acknowledgement of fractional owner’s operational control responsibilities.

Different subsidiaries of the fractional provider parent are the fractional provider party to the diverse agreements to separate their respective duties and obligations.

The fractional aircraft owner’s agreement is the only document that does not include a fractional provider entity. This agreement is solely between the owners of a specific aircraft and sets forth their obligations to each other.

The fractional aircraft dry-lease and exchange agreement is the agreement that makes fractional ownership work. It is essentially a dry lease (meaning no services related to ownership or operation of the aircraft are included) of the program aircraft amongst the various owners. The services needed are provided by the fractional program manager and arranged by the administrator of the dry lease agreement.

Fractional Jet Share Ownership ProgramThe aircraft acceptance form evidences when and where the aircraft share was delivered to the program participant. Normally the date of this document is the date that all of the agreements become effective.

The limited power of attorney grants the program provider the authority to act on the program participant’s behalf with regard to filing requirements with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). Some fractional providers even draft it in such a way that they have the ability to transfer the aircraft share back to them or to a third party. You need to check with the provider since some offer other options in lieu of the limited power of attorney.

The corporate resolution goes hand in hand with the limited power of attorney, giving the program participant the authority to provide the program provider the limited power of attorney. As its name states, this is only required when the program participant is a corporate entity.

The warranty bill of sale and assignment is in addition to the FAA bill of sale that is filed with the FAA and passes title and registers same with the FAA. The warranty bill of sale goes further in that it not only confirms the program participant’s ownership of the share but indemnifies the participant in the event title issues arise.

Finally there is the acknowledgement of fractional owner’s operational control responsibilities. This document is required if the program participant elects to have its flights conducted in accordance with Federal Aviation Regulation Part 91 subpart k. Some fractional programs only operate under Part 135, and in that case this document is not required.

Topics: fractional, fractional ownership, private jet, fractional share, private jets, jet lease, fractional program, fractional jet program

Fractional Jet Programs: What to Know About Your Fractional Provider

Posted on Fri, Jun 14,2013

Hawker 800XP Fractional Jet ProgramYou probably have had enough about fractional programs’ aircraft management services agreements, but there are a few more aspects to explore and review. Some are minor, some non-negotiable, but all could cause you to experience unexpected costs.

If needs change relating to your ownership structure, does the agreement provide for assignability to related and unrelated parties? If it does, is it provided as part of the service or are there related fees for the assignment? If you assign your share and have excess hours, do they go with the share or are they forfeit?

What insurance limits are provided and are they high enough to cover potential exposure? Can you buy “add-on” liability coverage? If the provider’s policy premiums increase over the term of your ownership, can they pass that increase on to you, and if the provider or the insurer makes changes to your coverage, are you notified prior to the change?

Catering can be very expensive; is catering included under services provided? What type of catering - is it preset or can you order whatever is available based on your departure point? Are aircraft stocked with snacks and beverages, and is the selection and variety appropriate for the aircraft type you own? Keep in mind that due to aircraft size and galley configuration, catering can be limited to space/storage available. It is no fun to fly with a tray or bag of food in your lap.

Most fractional providers have some form of interchange within the fleet provided there is more than one type of aircraft in the fleet. Some providers allow interchanging to smaller aircraft anytime but interchanging to larger aircraft on an as-available basis. Some allow you to interchange up or down freely (provided aircraft type requested is available). When you interchange in a fractional program, the hours you fly on the larger or smaller aircraft are multiplied by a preset interchange percentage. Is this percentage equitable or almost punitive?

Due to Federal Aviation Administration regulations that apply to fractional jet programs, you may have the option to have your flights flown either in accordance with FAR Part 91 or Part 135. Operationally, you will see little impact on electing to fly under either regulation. Some feel that opting for your flights to be flown in accordance with Part 135 provides more protection from potential liability in the event of an accident.

Each fractional program sets forth the rates they charge either on a monthly or hourly basis; some even have a fee charged on an annual basis. Be familiar with how they escalate, normally on an annual basis on January 1, but sometimes they have an increase built in to take effect at a certain point in an aircraft’s lifecycle.

The last item I want to touch on is aircraft availability. Does your program guarantee you an aircraft even if they have to charter one from a third party provider? If the provider does not guarantee an aircraft, what is your recourse? If they do guarantee an aircraft for all of your trips, what do they consider a “comparable” or better aircraft to the one you own?



Top Issues When Buying Fractional

Topics: fractional, fractional ownership, private jet, fractional share, private jets, fractional program, fractional jet program, Hawker 800XP

How to Exit a Fractional Program

Posted on Thu, Jun 06,2013

fractional programOK, you’ve had a lifestyle change and no longer need your private jet, or you need fewer hours than you did when you purchased the fractional share. What do you do? More importantly, what can you do (i.e. what are your options)?

Hopefully you are in a program with well-defined procedures for an easy and somewhat painless exit. The first step is sending written notice to your fractional provider. This step is critical since it starts the “clock” for timing your exit. Normally the full term of your commitment is five (5) years, but with an out after a minimum term is reached. These minimum terms range from 24 to 36 months. You do not have to wait until the minimum term expires and can give your written notice prior to expiration (usually 90 days prior).

Not only does the written termination notice start the clock, but it gives your fractional provider the ability to provide you with the agreements necessary to exit and their view of the market value for your fractional asset. Now what? Review the agreements to make sure they match the terms in the document package signed when you entered the program. Then look at the market value offered compared to what your fractional provider is reselling like shares for. How close are these values? You have to expect some variation but not huge differences. If in doubt, there are resources to call upon, such as ASA certified appraisers who are very knowledgeable in the aviation marketplace. For a relatively small fee, they could save you large amounts of money or at least give you peace of mind that the deal you are offered is fair and equitable.

Fractional ProgramIn addition, having the share appraised helps in your discussion with the fractional provider but may lead to the provider hiring an appraiser and further still to an appraiser arbitration process. Keep in mind – aircraft values are very sensitive to the economy, probably more so than any other asset you possess. We saw a Hawker 400 depreciate 87% in less than 10 years for one of our clients. Almost all programs have some form of brokerage fee deduction on repurchase; some vary by aircraft type and some vary by the length of your ownership. If you have exceeded the hours allotted for the period you owned your share, the fractional provider will reconcile your account and bill additional charges for any excess hours. Unfortunately, if you have under flown the contract, the majority of providers do not issue you a credit or payment for those unused hours.

Once the market value of your fractional share is agreed upon and the termination agreements have been executed, it is time to close the exit. Make sure the location for the transaction (the sale back of your share to the provider) is in a tax-free jurisdiction or your fractional provider issues you a tax exempt form since the provider is purchasing your share for resale.



Top 5 Issues Selling a Fractional Share

Topics: fractional, fractional ownership, Hawker 400XP, private jet, fractional share, private jets, fractional program, ASA certified appraisers, hawker 400